NEWS

Home made eco-friendly dishwasher detergent very good for Metro Vancouver area.

Simple not expensive and environmentally friendly. Specialy useful for soft water environment (Metro Vancouver)

Ingredients:

1 cup washing soda

1/2 cup citric acid

1/2 cup sea salt

Direction: Use 1 table spoon per load.

For rinse aid compartment use distilled white vinegar.

Tips on maintaining a front-load washing machine

  1. Always, always use detergent made for high-efficiency (HE) machines, and use the minimum amount (more is not necessarily better). Regular detergents produce much more suds, and over time, can build up a film on the drum and hoses that become a breeding ground for mold. Read the label carefully — some detergents are marked “HE compatible,” but still produce lots of suds, which is difficult to rinse out as your high-efficiency machine uses less water, and therefore should not be used in your front-loader. We can’t stress this enough — in same cases, using the wrong detergent may even void your warranty.
  2. Use less fabric softener (one teaspoon will soften a whole load). Ditto for bleach (one tablespoon for concentrated bleach, two tablespoons for regular). Remember, high-efficiency machines use less water, so less product is needed.
  3. Remove finished loads immediately. Do not let damp clothes sit in the machine (this provides an ideal breeding environment for musty smells and mildew). Care should be taken to ensure pets or children don’t climb in.
  4. When not in use, leave the door of the washer ajar, to improve air circulation inside the machine and to prevent the buildup of mold and mildew.
  5. Clean out the washer door’s rubber seal thoroughly. Remove any bits of hair or fabric you may find — these trap odors, sludge and provide a wonderful home for mold. Wipe the inside of the drum with this solution as well.
  6. For a third month cleaning session, pour some distilled white vinegar instead of laundry detergent into the dispenser, and add one cup of baking soda directly into the drum as well (this will neutralize the pH, but provide a scrubbing action). Run the machine on the hottest cycle, plus an extra rinse. For extreme cases of mildew-y smells, replace vinegar with bleach and run a few quick cycles with hot water. If there’s a self-cleaning cycle, follow your manual’s instructions on how to use it.
  7. Clean out the drain pump filter every few weeks or whenever you notice problems with water drainage, excessive vibrations, wet clothes after the final spin, longer than usual cycle time, or unusual pauses during a wash cycle. Hair, fabric, and other various bits can get clogged up in the drain pump filter, leading to sluggish drainage of water. The drain pump filter’s location varies by machine (check your manual for details) but it is usually located at the front and bottom of the machine behind a small trapdoor.
  8. Ensure that the spin speed you select is appropriate for the load you are washing — higher spin speeds may mean drier clothes prior to putting them in the dryer, but also means extra wear and tear on the machine’s inner parts, potentially shortening its lifespan.

Upgrade washing machine hoses to no burst hoses! (posted 5 Dec, 15)

If your washing machine is connected to bare rubber hoses, you’re risking thousands of dollars’ worth of water damage. Under constant water pressure, these hoses are prone to leaks or even bursting. That’s why building codes say that the water supply should be shut off when the washer isn’t in use—unless it’s connected to no-burst hoses.Old-Washing-Machine-Hoses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proper Dryer Maintenance (posted 27 Nov, 15)

By observing a few simple indications of poor system performance, one can examine the dryer components for any blockage or excessive heat. A clogged dryer vent may be your problem if: you notice heavy clothes such as blue jeans or towels taking a long time to dry, or clothes feel hotter than usual at the end of the cycle.

Follow these few safety tips:

Clean the lint screen/filter before or after drying each load of clothes. If clothing is still damp at the end of a typical drying cycle or drying requires longer times than normal, this may be a sign that the screen or the exhaust duct is blocked. Inspect lint screen for rips. If any are found, replace immediately.

Replace plastic or foil, accordion-type ducting material with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. Most manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, which provides maximum airflow. The flexible foil type duct can more easily trap lint and is more susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the airflow. Note: WHITE VINYL HOSE is prohibited and should never be used in dryer venting.

Disconnect, clean, and inspect the dryer duct and venting every couple of years, or hire a company to clean the dryer components. Some dryer vents may need more frequent inspection, such as in homes with complex construction where the dryer vents exceed 6 feet from the outside, or with smaller stack dryers and dryers that are older and do not have moisture sensors or high temperature safety limit controls. This will reduce the fire risk and increase the dryer’s efficiency.

Wasp Nest Obstructing Vent Flapper
Wasp Nest Obstructing Vent

Inspect your outside exhaust termination. Outside wall dampers should have a covering that will keep out rain, snow, and dirt. However, do not use wire screen or cloth of any kind to protect the exhaust opening. It can collect lint and clog areas of the dryer vent. In order to deter birds and small animals from nesting in vents, make sure the dryer vent system and damper are working suitably.

Keep the area around the dryer clean and free from clutter. Clean behind dryer, where lint can build up. Have a qualified service person clean the interior of the dryer chassis periodically to minimize the amount of lint accumulation.

Never let your clothes dryer run while you are out of the house or asleep. If it malfunctions, no one will be there to avert possible disaster.

Never put synthetic materials such as rubber, plastic, foam, or pieces of cloth that have been used to sponge up flammable liquids in the dryer, even if previously washed. Vapors from these products could ignite or explode.

Have gas-powered dryers inspected by a professional annually to ensure that the gas line and connection are intact and free of leaks.

Install a smoke detector in or near your laundry room. Consider installing a carbon monoxide detector if using a gas-powered dryer.